Fall Foliage in a Townhouse Garden

Fall Foliage in a Townhouse Garden
I would have shown you these fall photos of my Maryland garden in the actual fall if a technical glitch hadn’t kept me from posting here at all for a couple of weeks. So imagine it’s mid-November in my back garden, where my recent shrub- and tree-buying is really paying off, small space be damned. My one perennial that still looks good is Amsonia hubrichtii, in the foreground. Behind it is an Oakleaf Hydrangea. Further right and rising above the screen are the orange-tipped yellow leaves of Redbud ‘Rising Sun.’ Gorgeous. On the sidewalk side of the screen you see the Redbud on the left, along with the red leaves of ‘Mt. Airy’ Fothergilla and purple leaves of a Purple Smokebush. Below them is a variegated evergreen Acuba ‘Picturata.’ Closeup of the Fothergilla. Above is the view from my living room with three Japanese maples doing their fall thing. The... Read More

How to Install a Pocket Door

How to Install a Pocket Door
What is a pocket door? And how do you install a pocket door? Learn the tips and tricks for installing a pocket door to save floor space from a traditional hinged door swing. An excellent solution for small spaces or awkward door areas. For more small space solutions, try these: Tips to make a small space feel open, our Foldable Craft Table, and a Small space homework or office station. Before we show you how to install a pocket door — let’s answer the most common question: What is a pocket door? A pocket door is a sliding door on a track inside the wall. Where a sliding barn door and the barn door hardware are on the outside of the wall, a pocket door and pocket door hardware are installed inside the wall and completely hidden. Hidden pocket doors are great solutions for small spaces and half … Read More

Tending my 5 Adopted Gardens

Tending my 5 Adopted Gardens
Behold my pick-up truck 2013 Honda CRV! Just don’t ask me to give more than one person a ride anywhere on short notice, coz it would take a while to make the back seat presentable again, and then just barely. The reason my car always looks like this, even in late December, is that since taking over several public sites to garden, my car has become a tool shed and temporary storage for yard waste in one direction, mulch and wood chips in the other. Fortunately I don’t give a damn what my car looks like, but I do care about my 5 adopted gardens. Turns out, the townhouse I moved into 8 years ago now, which I chose partly for the small garden, isn’t quite enough for my gardening obsession needs. Honestly, I’m thrilled by the opportunity to do garden make-overs, especially dramatic ones in very visible spots, like... Read More

10 Expert Gardening Tips For Inexperienced persons

10 Expert Gardening Tips For Inexperienced persons
Gardening From up to date lighting corresponding to lamps and candleholders to creative equipment like vases and mirrors, discover hundreds of home décor selections that will help you personalize every room. There are a lot of ways by which undesirable pests are removed from a garden. The methods differ depending on the pest, the gardener’s objectives, and the gardener’s philosophy. For example, snails may be dealt with by means of using a chemical pesticide, an organic pesticide, hand-picking, barriers, or just growing snail-resistant plants. In colleges where home economics, meals know-how (previously often called ” home science “), or culinary arts are taught, there are usually a collection of kitchens with multiple tools (similar in some respects to laboratories ) solely for the aim of instructing. These include a number of workstations, each with its personal oven , sink , and kitchen utensils, the place the teacher can show students... Read More

What’s in a decade? Plenty of gardening, for sure.

What’s in a decade? Plenty of gardening, for sure.
2010 was the year 70 garden bloggers came to Buffalo and toured this lovely spot, among others. There’s been a deluge of backward-looking articles and posts, so why should Rant be any different? Except that this will be, because I am too busy with my day job and side jobs (paid and unpaid) to go through a decade of Rant posts. Anyway, we did that when we celebrated our ten-year anniversary in 2016; that was definitely a highlight for us! It is interesting to think about how the gardening discourse has changed over the past ten years, and, in some ways, our discussions on Rant provide some insight on what has changed. I did glance back at some 2010 posts and found some indication of what has changed most. HOUSEPLANTS! I was mocked or ignored, pretty much, whenever I posted about houseplants. In fact, one of my earliest Rant posts... Read More

We Hired an Expert to Teach Coop Members to Prune their (damn) Hedges

We Hired an Expert to Teach Coop Members to Prune their (damn) Hedges
Marianne made the case against HOA gardening rules, but my community has a different problem, dare I say a much bigger one? A New Deal project, my planned community included an unfortunate garden feature – 18″ privet hedges, which are inherently high-maintenance and, we know now, invasive. And ours were planted very close to our sidewalks. Over the years, with height limitations having been eliminated by the ruling body (our 1,600-unit coop), look what’s become of those cute little hedges? It’s even worse when there are tall hedges on both sides. Pedestrians, especially women walking alone at night, don’t feel safe. There are errant branches endangering pedestrians throughout the community. (And fallen leaves never cleared from sidewalks, but that’s an other rant.) It’s largely due to euonymus becoming the dominant hedge type. It’s much more vigorous than privet and it’s gotten damn large for our tiny yards. Especially where … Read More

Coloration Matching Easter Egg Recreation

Coloration Matching Easter Egg Recreation
Gardening Giant or small, sunny or shady – there are many tasks you can do in your garden to attract wildlife. Avery Perry began as one of the companions of the previous Nella Pasta shop, and just lately launced his very personal handmade pasta shop on the Boston Public Market. Regulation of Pasta is all about the fantastic thing about recent, handmade pastas in a variety of shapes and flavors utilizing regionally sourced veggies, herbs and ancient grains along with take-and-go lunch and dinner options. Avery will at all times make conventional pasta, however as the self proclaimed Mad Scientist” of the culinary world, he often jumps out the box and creates unique taste profiles that may leave you anticipating your subsequent trip to the Boston Public Market. As one of many largest house owners of agricultural land and the premier steward of the cultural and natural panorama of Massachusetts, … Read More

Is social distancing a natural thing for gardeners?

Is social distancing a natural thing for gardeners?
A better term is “physical distancing,” which is literally what I have to do when I am working in the front garden and anyone walks by. Rather than tread on April-soggy soil, I retreat down the walkway as it’s the only way to put enough feet between me and the sidewalk. Otherwise, nothing stops me from my usual spring chores. Garden centers are open, many deliver, and working outside on my own property seems safe enough. The usual conclusion is that gardening offers a satisfying outlet in these days of uncertainty and fear. I even wrote a column that started, “If you’re a gardener, this is your time.” It’s true, as far as it goes. But then I realize how social the gardening world really is. One good barometer is our Facebook gardening group, which is receiving dozens of requests to join on a daily basis. I think this is... Read More

A Very Rocky Obsession – GardenRant

A Very Rocky Obsession – GardenRant
Back when the gardening bug really hit me, we were raising two kids and watching our dollars. Or, at least watching the few we acquired being whisked off to creditors. We had no extra money around to buy soil, plants, mulch, or anything else. Yet, I was obsessed, and I kept starting new garden beds. Managed this mostly by filling new beds with whatever flotsam and jetsam I could find–old bricks, rotten firewood, AMC Pacers, whatever, and then covering it all with a few inches of whatever soil I could scrounge. This could be small amounts leftover from landscape work, scraped off topsoil from the woods, and sometimes a sandy, gravelly mix filled with weed seeds from a nearby creek. The soil in this bed consists mainly of gravel and sand from a creek bank. Very spare and quick to drain, but a lot of plants seem to thrive in... Read More